By Kristina Blockx

Despite of high unemployment rates among the youth in Spain, not everyone is worried. Alberto Mineral thinks that the youth should be more optimistic

“It is constantly said in the news and everywhere that there is no work and no jobs in Spain. It’s like they want to make us afraid of the future,” says Alberto Mineral. He is 21 years old and is studying Fine Arts at the Rey Juan University in Fuenlabrada, a smaller city outside Madrid.

At the moment more than four out of ten people under the age of 25 are without a job in Spain. Despite of the statistics and what the media are saying, Alberto is not worried about the employment rates in his home country.

“I am optimistic about the situation. There are lots and lots of opportunities. You just have to look for them. I’m not a rich person or anything but I’m convinced that you just have to be confident and then seize the opportunities you stumble upon. We need to be optimistic,” he says.

A lack of optimism

According to Alberto the atmosphere among the youngsters are very pessimistic when they discuss the future. “My friends are not optimistic at all. They live with a lot of fears and are always saying that they are not going to get a job. I’m convinced that they will be fine as long as they set their minds up for it. The problem is that they are always complaining about the situation instead of doing something about it,” says Alberto, who thinks that the mentality of the Spanish youth is a big obstacle for their job opportunities.

“Right now I don’t have a job because I just arrived in Fuenlabrada in September. I want to spend my first year getting used to it and then I’m planning to get a job next year,” continues Alberto, who left his home town Zaragoza in the Northern part of Spain to study near the capital. He is confident that it won’t be a problem for him to find a job. ”In Zaragoza I always had a job. Of course it depends on what kind of job you are looking for. If you don’t have too high demands, it should be easy to find something – especially in a city of this size,” he elaborates.

The opportunities of the future

In four years Alberto will finish his degree. So at the moment he just wants to concentrate on doing well and not worry about his job situation after he graduates.
“I’m not sure what the future will bring. I’m open to anything. Maybe I will move away from Spain to another country where they are more optimistic. On the other side, if I am going to make a huge effort anyway for going abroad, I might as well stay here and make an effort to find a good job. I’m sure I’ll succeed if I try again and again,” says Alberto.

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